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The Tops Are Where It's At

. . . May 04, 2016 | posted by Rosie_Hunt
The Tops Are Where It's At

It’s early spring and radishes and turnips are thriving right now! There was a time when I wasn’t so excited to see radishes or turnips, but now, I can admire their beautiful colors and the culinary options they offer in the kitchen. These little guys are super versatile. 

Let’s start with the tops because, let’s be honest, the tops are where it’s at. Often, when vegetables come with green tops, like carrots, beets, turnips, etc.. they get thrown away. Please don’t throw them away. I repeat: Please Don’t Throw Them Away! There are so many things you can do with these beauties. 

First up... Drum roll please... Pesto! 

You can turn about anything into a pesto, and I have to be honest and say that I can devour in large, copious amounts, some fresh pesto. 

You can use either the radish greens or the turnip greens. We've been getting both and we'll probably see more of these guys in the future weeks. I've thrown in kale because we'll it kale and I love it. 

When making pesto, you can use about any nut you prefer.Traditionally the pine nut is used. I have made this pesto with a variety of nuts so feel free to change it up if you’d like. The pine nut seems to stay tride and true for me. 

It also freezes well. Scoop the pesto into a freezer bag or jar and place in the freezer until later months. Enjoy pesto year around! Once you make it yourself I promise you'll never want to buy the store stuff again. 

 

Radish (or Turnip) Greens &  Kale Pesto 

INGREDIENTS 

1 cups torn kale (destemmed)

1 cup torn radish (or turnip) greens (destemmed) 

1-2 clove garlic

½ teaspoon salt (more to taste)

juice of half a lemon

 1/3 cup pine nuts 

 ¼ cup olive oil

** If you like it cheesy (ha!) Add 2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast or Parmesan cheese. Adding a bit of cheese will also cut the spiciness of the radish tops.

      

INSTRUCTIONS

1.    Pulse the radish greens, kale, garlic, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor until coarse.

2. With the food processor on, slowly add the olive oil until smooth. 

3.    Add the pinenuts and pulse a few more times or until the nuts are ground to desired consistency.

The Tops Are Where It's At

. . . May 04, 2016 | posted by Rosie_Hunt
The Tops Are Where It's At

It’s early spring and radishes and turnips are thriving right now! There was a time when I wasn’t so excited to see radishes or turnips, but now, I can admire their beautiful colors and the culinary options they offer in the kitchen. These little guys are super versatile. 

Let’s start with the tops because, let’s be honest, the tops are where it’s at. Often, when vegetables come with green tops, like carrots, beets, turnips, etc.. they get thrown away. Please don’t throw them away. I repeat: Please Don’t Throw Them Away! There are so many things you can do with these beauties. 

First up... Drum roll please... Pesto! 

You can turn about anything into a pesto, and I have to be honest and say that I can devour in large, copious amounts, some fresh pesto. 

You can use either the radish greens or the turnip greens. We've been getting both and we'll probably see more of these guys in the future weeks. I've thrown in kale because we'll it kale and I love it. 

When making pesto, you can use about any nut you prefer.Traditionally the pine nut is used. I have made this pesto with a variety of nuts so feel free to change it up if you’d like. The pine nut seems to stay tride and true for me. 

It also freezes well. Scoop the pesto into a freezer bag or jar and place in the freezer until later months. Enjoy pesto year around! Once you make it yourself I promise you'll never want to buy the store stuff again. 

 

Radish (or Turnip) Greens &  Kale Pesto 

INGREDIENTS 

1 cups torn kale (destemmed)

1 cup torn radish (or turnip) greens (destemmed) 

1-2 clove garlic

½ teaspoon salt (more to taste)

juice of half a lemon

 1/3 cup pine nuts 

 ¼ cup olive oil

** If you like it cheesy (ha!) Add 2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast or Parmesan cheese. Adding a bit of cheese will also cut the spiciness of the radish tops.

      

INSTRUCTIONS

1.    Pulse the radish greens, kale, garlic, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor until coarse.

2. With the food processor on, slowly add the olive oil until smooth. 

3.    Add the pinenuts and pulse a few more times or until the nuts are ground to desired consistency.

Easy Pineapple Radish Salsa

. . . Apr 17, 2016 | posted by Rosie_Hunt
Easy Pineapple Radish Salsa

This week, at my house, I’ve been practically drooling over fresh salad greens, and I am in awe of the crunchy breakfast radishes. I remember a time last year thinking I never wanted to see another radish or salad green in my life.  Now, I’m using those salad greens as chips because I missed them so much. Needless to say, I have been dying for CSA season to come back around. 

My name is Rosie Hunt. Food enthusiast, blogger, and teacher. Tubby Creek has graciously allowed me to partner with them this year. I will be featuring recipes each week with the ingredients that you will be seeing in your CSA box. If this is your first year, welcome! If you’ve been here a million times before, here’s to another fantastic adventure of fresh, locally grown food. First up, the radish! They are slightly spicy and commonly tossed on top of a salad. But... radishes are extremely versatile!!! This is why I had to make a quick and easy salsa out of it. Eat this with chips. Salad green chips for all I care. Throw it on tacos. It’s so darn tasty, it might not even make it onto your plate. 

Easy Pineapple Radish Salsa 

Ingredients:

1 cup easter egg radishes, chopped

1 cup pineapple, chopped

1/4 cup red onion, diced 

handful of cilantro

1/4 jalapeño, deseeded & diced

1/2 lemon juiced

 Instructions: 

1. Add all the ingredients into a bowl. Mix well. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. 

2. Enjoy!

 

See you next week! 

Join Our Community Suuported Agriculture (CSA)

. . . Mar 03, 2016 | posted by randy

Registration for our 2016 CSA is now available SOLD OUT. Below is information and pricing for our 2016 CSA. Our NEW online registration form is now available here (this will open in a new window). If you prefer you can download and mail in a paper copy just click here. You can receive a 3% discount if paying by check or cash.

Community Supported Agriculture is a farming model based on a relationship between the farmer and the patrons of the farm.  Individuals and households can buy a "share" of the farm produce, becoming members or share-holders in the CSA. 

Why have a CSA?  Farming is an inherently risky business.  In our typical food system, farmers bear all the risks of adverse weather and crop failure, while consumers enjoy the perennial summer of the grocery store.  This leaves farmers exposed and at risk, and leaves consumers disconnected from the source of their food, feeling powerless to avert the crisis of the loss of our nation's farmers and farmland. 

With CSA, farmers and the people they feed are in it together. The farmer makes the promise to provide a (typically) weekly box or bag of whatever is in season.  The member or share-holder promises to get their vegetables from that farmer every week, often paying for the entire season's worth of vegetables in advance.  Farmers get added security, a fair price, cash flow at the beginning of the season when they need it most, and a real relationship with their members. 

Share-holders also get many benefits, essentially, they get a family farm!  Not too long ago, most Americans were connected to a farm in their own family, but this is not so anymore.  Share-holders get the satisfaction of supporting a local farm family, a better value for their money, the security of know where their food comes from and how it is produced, and the enjoyment of visiting the farm and having a personal relationship with their farmers.

Want to be sure that CSA is right for you before making the commitment?  This simple test may help you decide.

There are thousands of CSA farms across the country, and they all do it a little differently.  Here's the skinny on Tubby Creek Farm's CSA:

Our Shares

We will be accepting 65 CSA membership in 2016.  Small shares cost $15.45 per week, and are good for households of two people, or even a sinlge vegetable maniac.  Full shares ($25.75 per week) are ideal for households of two or three, or families with a couple small children.  

The growing season in north Mississippi is long.  We have divided our CSA into three seasons, Spring, Summer and Fall.

Spring Share:  Full Share $206.00 or Small Share $123.60

Our spring CSA runs April 6 through May 28 (8 weeks).   Over the course of the spring, you can expect head lettuce, salad mix, arugula, spring onions, cabbage, kohlrabi, kale, turnip roots and greens, collards, mustard, bok choy, beets, asparagus, and usually potatoes, squash and cabbage towards the end of May. 

Summer Share:  Full Share $360.50 or Small Share $216.30

Our summer CSA runs June 1 through September 3 (14 weeks).  Over the course of the summer, you can expect potatoes, carrots, cucumbers, squash, snap beans, okra, onions, tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, melons, garlic, southern peas, and more.

Fall Share:  Full Share $283.25 or Small Share $169.95

Our fall CSA runs September 7 through November 19 (11 weeks).  Over the course of the fall, you can expect cucumbers, squash, melons, okra, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, root vegetables, salad mix, lettuce, various greens, snow and snap peas, cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi, sweet potatoes, and winter squash.   

Pasture Raised Meat and Eggs

Members of our 2016 vegetable CSA can choose to add whole broiler chickens, and/or farm fresh eggs to their shares. 

Egg Shares are sold out for 2016: Full Egg Share $154.50 or Half Egg Share $77.25 (only available to members that commit to all three seasons)

Our laying flock lives in a mobile chicken coop that we move around so that they always have access to plenty of insects, grass seeds and other snacks. As the number of eggs that our chickens lay varies continuously throughout the year, egg share members will recieve a proportion of all the eggs laid in a given week.  There will be extra eggs in spring, and fewer eggs in October and November as the hens start preparing for winter.  We expect that to average out to one dozen per week over the course of the season for Full Egg Share members, and a half dozen per week for Half Egg Share members.          

Whole Broilers:  Spring $41.20, Summer $61.80. Fall $61.80

We also offer pasture raised Freedom Ranger broiler chickens to our CSA members.  The chicks arrive on the farm just a couple days old, they have never been given antibiotics, they have constant access to pasture from 2 or 3 weeks old, and are even processed right here on our farm.  A Broiler Chicken share includes one whole, frozen chicken per month (4.5 lbs avg. $20.60/month), delivered on the first week of each month.

American Guinea Hog Pork and Goat Meat

We will not have pork or goat meat available as a CSA in 2016. However we will have cuts available for purchase at our booth at the Saturday Cooper Young Community Farmers Market and for Wednesday CSA members we will have an online ordering system in place by April. That way you can select what you want to pick up with your CSA delivery.

Pick up

Shares are available for pick up:

Saturday mornings at the Cooper-Young Community Farmers Market in midtown Memphis (CYCFM pick up closed as of 02/01/2016)

Wednesdays 9:00Am to 5:00PM at the Crews Center for Entrepreneurship at 3618 Walker

JUST ADDED Wednesday Noon to 7:00PM at Wholesale Nutrition 2130 W. Popular Suite #102 Collierville, TN 38107

Wednesdays shares are also available for pick up at Tubby Creek Farm in Ashland Mississippi

Registration

You can now fill out our registration form online here or if you prefer you can click here for a downloadable paper version.

Seeking Interns for 2016 Growing Season!

. . . Jan 15, 2016 | posted by Josephine

We are now accepting applications for full-time and part-time internships for the 2016 growing season.  Do you want to get dirty, sweaty and bone tired?  Farming isn't for everyone, but for those of us who love it, there is nothing more satisfying than turning sunlight and soil into good food.  If you want to get an education in sustainable agriculture, first hand experience on a working farm will give you real life skills and training as well as a sense of the farming lifestyle.  Prospective farmers who choose to intern over the whole season will experience how management decisions impact the farm months later.  Our 2015 intern Chris Peterson of Loch Holland Farm says:

"my time spent as an intern with Josephine and Randy was indispensible to my education as a farmer.  Jo and Randy are actually making their living by farming.  The primary reason to choose Tubby Creek Farm over other internship opportunities is that your experience will give you an accurate picture of the multitude of hats you will have to wear as a small farmer.  Moving into my second season operating my own farm, I can attest that this direct involvement in every facet of operating a small, sustainable farm—from planning to profit—is easily the most value for money that you can get as you start on your own farm journey."

Why do we have interns?  Certainly we benefit from the work that interns do on the farm, but that isn't the whole story.  I got my start as a farm intern my first year out of college at Philadelphia Community Farm in Osceola, Wisconsin.  Without that experience, I doubt I would be farming today.  Besides the multitude of practical knowledge, I also got a sense of the flow of the seasons, life on a farm, and the challenge of making critical management decisions every day.  I wasn't sure if I had the chops for farming.  It seemed too risky, too hard.  But I was bitten by the farming bug, and ten years later, here I am.  And working with interns is fun!  We enjoy the opportunity to share our successes and failures with folks who really want to learn.

Click here for details about becoming a Tubby Creek Farm intern